Saturday, 16 November 2019

Governor announces members of Future of Work Commission

SACRAMENTO – Gov. Gavin Newsom announced members of his Future of Work Commission, which include prominent leaders from technology, labor, business, education and other sectors across the state.

The commission will be ​co-chaired by James Manyika, chairman and director of the McKinsey Global Institute, and Mary Kay Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union, and will be guided by senior members of the governor’s team, including secretary of the Labor and Workforce Development Agency Julie Su, Chief Economic and Business Advisor Lenny Mendonca, and Senior Policy Advisor Lande Ajose.

The commission will be tasked with making recommendations to help California leaders think through how to create inclusive, long-term economic growth and ensure workers and their families share in that success.

“The economy right now isn’t working for workers,” said Gov. Newsom. “While our state is ground zero for the technological and economic transformations that are shaping the future of work, Californians are facing a crisis of opportunity and affordability. We must do the planning required to ensure that we educate and train workers for the jobs of the future, and that these jobs create pathways for economic mobility and the reduction of economic inequality in our state.”

The executive order establishing the commission states, “The Future of Work Commission’s primary mission shall be to study, understand, analyze, and make recommendations regarding the kinds of jobs Californians could have in the decades to come; the impact of technology on work, workers, employers, jobs and society; methods of promoting better job quality, wages, and working conditions through technology; modernizing worker safety net protections; and the best way to preserve good jobs, ready the workforce for the jobs of the future through lifelong learning, and ensure shared prosperity for all.”

The commission will work in public-private partnership with the Institute for the Future, which will bring together diverse stakeholders to support and guide the work of the commission and help develop a public agenda to promote shared prosperity for all Californians. Funding for the Institute for the Future's work with the commission will be provided by the James Irvine Foundation and the Ford Foundation, both of which have been leaders in promoting equitable approaches to the future of work. The commission will produce an interim report on its progress by May 1, 2020.

To learn more about the commission, click here.

Gov. Newsom appointed the following members to the Future of Work Commission:

Mary Kay Henry, 62, of Washington, D.C., has been president of the Service Employees International Union since 2010. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Henry is a Democrat.

James Manyika, 53, of San Francisco, is a senior partner at McKinsey and has been chairman and director of the McKinsey Global Institute since 2009. He was appointed vice chair of the Global Development Council at the White House by President Obama from 2012 to 2016, and appointed by U.S. Commerce Secretaries to serve on the National Innovation Advisory Board from 2010 to 2012 and the Commerce Department’s Digital Economy Board of Advisors from 2016 to 2017. Manyika is a member of the McKinsey Board of Directors. Manyika serves on the boards of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the Walter and Flora Hewlett, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur and Markle Foundations. He earned Doctor of Philosophy, Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees in AI and robotics, mathematics and computer science from Oxford, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Manyika is registered without party preference.

Roy Bahat, 42, of San Francisco, has been head of Bloomberg Beta since 2013 and a lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley since 2011. He was vice president of business development at News Corporation and president of IGN Entertainment from 2006 to 2012. He was a senior policy director for the Office of the New York City Mayor, director of international relations for NYC2012 from 2002 to 2005 and an associate at McKinsey & Co. from 2000 to 2002. He is a member of the Council on Technology and Society, the Shift Commission on Work, Workers, and Technology, and the Economic Security Project, and is vice chairman of the Center for Investigative Reporting. Bahat earned a Master of Philosophy degree in economics from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Bahat is registered without party preference.

Doug Bloch, 49, San Francisco, has been political director at Teamsters Joint Council 7 since 2010. He was the Port of Oakland campaign director for Change to Win from 2006 to 2010 and a senior research analyst at Service Employees International Union Local 1877 from 2004 to 2006. Bloch was statewide political director at the California Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) from 2003 to 2004 and ran several ACORN regional offices, including Seattle and Oakland, from 1999 to 2003. He was an organizer at the NGO Coordinating Committee for Northeast Thailand from 1999 to 2003. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Bloch is a Democrat.

Soraya Coley, 68, of Pomona, has served as president of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona since 2015. She was provost and vice president for academic affairs at California State University, Bakersfield from 2005 to 2014, a senior research fellow for the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare from 2004 to 2005 and system-wide provost and vice president for academic affairs for Alliant International University from 2001 to 2003. Coley held multiple positions at California State University, Fullerton from 1981 to 2001. Coley is a member of the Los Angeles Coalition for the Economy & Jobs, Los Angeles County Fair Association and the Pomona Community Foundation, and serves as presidential sponsor for the American Council on Education Women's Network for Southern California. Coley earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree in social planning and policy and a Master of Social Welfare degree in social planning and social research from Bryn Mawr College. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Coley is registered without party preference.

Lloyd Dean, 69, of Los Angeles, is chief executive officer of CommonSpirit Health, a newly created national health care system formed by Dignity Health and Catholic Health Initiatives. He is co-chair of the California Future Health Workforce Commission, chair of the Board of Directors for the Committee on Jobs in San Francisco, and a member of the McDonald’s Board of Directors. Dean holds degrees in sociology and education from Western Michigan University and received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from the University of San Francisco. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. He is a Democrat.

Jennifer Granholm, 60, of Oakland has been a contributor to CNN since 2016, a senior advisor to Media Matters and American Bridge since 2016 and has been on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy since 2011. She served as Governor of Michigan from 2002 to 2011 and was Michigan’s Attorney General from 1998 to 2002. Granholm sits on numerous private sector and non-profit boards, including Proterra Inc., Techtonic, MIT’s Advisory Board on Work of the Future, Carnegie Mellon Block Center Advisory Board on the Future of Work and the University of California, Berkeley’s workgroup on Work in the Age of Intelligent Tools. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Granholm is a Democrat.

Lance Hastings, 54, of Wilton, has been president and chief executive officer of the California Manufacturers and Technology Association since 2018. He was vice president of national affairs for MillerCoors from 2015 to 2018, head of regulatory and tax affairs at SABMiller from 2012 to 2015 and director of state government relations at Miller Brewing Company from 2003 to 2012. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Hastings is a Republican.

Saru Jayaraman, 44, of Oakland, is the co-founder and president of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which she co-founded in 2002, and director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy since 2013. She was an associate professor at Brooklyn College from 2007 to 2012 and an attorney and organizer for the Workplace Project from 2001 to 2002. Jayaraman earned a Juris Doctor degree from Yale Law School and a Master of Public Policy degree from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She is author of two books, Behind the Kitchen Door (Cornell University Press, 2013) and Forked: A New Standard for American Dining (Oxford University Press, 2016). This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. She is a Democrat.

Carla Javits, 64, of Kensington, has been president and chief executive officer of the Roberts Enterprise Development Fund since 2007. She was president and chief executive officer at the Corporation for Supportive Housing from 2000 to 2006, where she was California director from 1992 to 2000. Javits was director of policy and planning for the San Francisco Department of Human Services from 1988 to 1991 and a program analyst in the California Office of the Legislative Analyst from 1985 to 1988. Javits earned a Master of Public Policy degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. She is registered without party preference.

Tom Kalil, 55, of Lafayette, has been chief innovation officer at Schmidt Futures since 2017. He was deputy director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy for President Obama from 2009 to 2017. Kalil was special assistant to the Chancellor for Science and Technology at the University of California, Berkeley from 2001 to 2008 and was chair of the Global Health Working Group for the Clinton Global Initiative in 2007 and 2008. He also served on the White House National Economic Council from 1993 to 2001 and from 2000 to 2001, was deputy assistant to President Clinton for technology and economic policy. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Kalil is a Democrat.

Ash Kalra, 47, of San Jose, was elected to represent the 27th California State Assembly District in 2016, and was appointed Chair of the Assembly Committee on Labor and Employment and sits on the Aging and Long Term Care, Education, Judiciary, Water, Parks, and Wildfire committees. Previously, Kalra served as a San Jose City Councilmember, and as a deputy public defender in Santa Clara County. Kalra earned a Juris Doctor degree from the Georgetown University Law Center and is the first Indian-American to serve in the California Legislature. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Kalra is a Democrat.

Stephane Kasriel, 44, of San Francisco, has been chief executive officer of Upwork Inc. since 2015, after being vice president of product at Upwork's predecessor company oDesk, and subsequently senior vice president of product and engineering from 2012 to 2015. He held multiple positions at PayPal from 2004 to 2010, including managing director for PayPal France, global head of consumer products and global head of mobile business development. Kasriel serves as co-chair for the World Economic Forum's Council on the New Social Contract and previously served as co-chair for the World Economic Forum's Council on Education, Gender and Work. Kasriel earned a Master of Business Administration degree from INSEAD and a Master of Science degree in computer science from Stanford University. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Kasriel is a Democrat.

Fei-Fei Li, 43, of Stanford, has been the inaugural Sequoia Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University since 2019 and co-director of Stanford's newly established Human-Centered AI Institute since 2018. She was director of Stanford’s AI Lab from 2013 to 2018. She was vice president at Google and chief scientist of AI/ML at Google Cloud from 2017 to 2018. Li co-founded and is chairperson of AI4ALL. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. She is registered without party preference.

John Marshall, 51, of Berkeley, has been senior capital markets analyst for United Food and Commercial Workers Union since 2009. He was research director for the Service Employees International Union’s Capital Stewardship Program from 2006 to 2009, where he was international representative 2004 to 2006. He was a senior financial analyst at Ullico Inc. from 2003 to 2004. Marshall earned a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of California, Los Angeles and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst designation. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Marshall is a Democrat.

Art Pulaski, 66, of Berkeley, has served as executive-secretary treasurer and chief officer of the California Labor Federation since 1996, president of the California Works Foundation since 2000 and a member of the Board of Directors of the State Compensation Insurance Fund since 2018. He was president of the Labor Project for Working Families from 1990 to 2000 and PBS series “We Do the Work” from 1991 from 1997. Pulaski was founder of PalCare from 1989 to 1996 and executive-secretary of the San Mateo County Central Labor Council from 1984 to 1996. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Pulaski is a Democrat.

Maria Salinas, 54, of Pasadena, has been president and chief executive officer of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce since 2018. She was president of Salinas Consulting from 2006 to 2018, director of the Walt Disney Company from 1995 to 2006 and manager of Ernst and Young from 1991 to 1995. Salinas was staff accountant at Kenneth Leventhal and Company from 1987 to 1991. She is a member of the Women Corporate Directors Association, Latino Corporate Directors Association, National Association of Women Business Owners and the Loyola Marymount University Board of Regents. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Salinas is a Democrat.

Peter Schwartz, 73, of Berkeley, has been senior vice president for strategic planning and chief future officer at Salesforce.com since 2011. He founded the Global Business Network in 1988 and was head of scenario planning for Royal Dutch Shell from 1981 to 1986. Schwartz was director of the Strategic Environment Center at the Stanford Research Institute in 1978. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Schwartz is a Democrat.

Henry Stern, 37, of Calabasas, was elected to represent the 27th California State Senate District in 2016. He is a former environmental lawyer, law lecturer, senior policy advisor and civics teacher. He chairs the Senate Natural Resources and Water Committee and formerly chaired the Elections and Constitutional Amendments Committee. He earned a Juris Doctor degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Stern is a Democrat.

Mariana Viturro, 44, of Berkeley, is deputy director at the National Domestic Workers Alliance. She is board chair of Care in Action and an advisory member of the Supermajority Education Fund. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Viturro is registered without party preference.

Betty Yee, 61, of Alameda, was elected California State Controller in 2014, and has served as a voting member of the California Board of Equalization since 2004. Yee served as chief deputy director for budget at the California Department of Finance from 1999 to 2003 and in multiple senior staff positions for several fiscal and policy committees in both houses of the California State Legislature from 1988 to 1999. Yee is a member of the board of directors of Ceres, a national nonprofit organization tackling sustainability challenges including climate change, water scarcity and pollution. She earned a Master of Public Administration degree from Golden Gate University. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Yee is a Democrat.

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